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Advent Calendar 16. Game

dist3rio

The West Team
In-Game Supporter
Howdy Cowboys and Cowgirls,

Our sixteenth game has arrived! We are here again with another game!
Hope you have a lovely evening :)


Game:
In Danish, we have a Christmas song where the lines here are included: 'first the tree must be shown, then it must be eaten'. Of course, it is not the spruce tree we eat, but among other things because, before Christmas trees became everyone's property, they used kale sticks, which they decorated with candles and treats ... But how long have we known about the candy cane?


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Good luck!

Your The West Team
 

ATSIZ.

Active Member
“Legend has it that the candy cane dates back to 1670, when the choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral in Germany handed out sugar sticks among his young singers to keep them quiet during the Living Creche ceremony,” Schildhaus says. “In honor of the occasion, he bent the candies into shepherds' crooks.
 

starshaped

Active Member
A common folkloric story of the origin of candy canes says that in 1670, in Cologne, Germany, the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral, wishing to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during the Living Crèche tradition of Christmas Eve, asked a local candy maker for some "sugar sticks" for them. In order to justify the practice of giving candy to children during worship services, he asked the candy maker to add a crook to the top of each stick, which would help children remember the shepherds who visited the infant Jesus.
 

Junkz

Well-Known Member
Since 1670

According to folklore, in 1670 in Cologne, Germany, the Cologne Cathedral choir director, wanting to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during performances involving the tradition of the nativity scene on Christmas Eve, asked a maker candy shop that made "sugar sticks" for them. In order to justify the practice of giving candy to children during the service, he asked the candy maker to add a cane shape, which would help the children remember the shepherds who visited baby Jesus.
 

Abydos1

Well-Known Member
Legend has it that the candy cane dates back to 1670, when the choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral in Germany handed out sugar sticks among his young singers to keep them quiet during the Living Creche ceremony,” Schildhaus says. “In honor of the occasion, he bent the candies into shepherds' crooks.
 

Bitter Lemon

Active Member
In the town park of the Swedish town of Gränna in Småland, directly on Lake Vättern, Sweden's second largest lake, stands the bronze statue of a very special woman: Amalia Eriksson. According to legend, she invented the red-and-white curled candy canes.
 

Harriet Oleson

Well-Known Member
Hi,
Seems like the candy cane took shape in 17th century. According to a legend it's more precisely since 1670 but no proof about it.
The question is "how long have we known it", so in centuries the answer is more than 3 centuries; and in years (and if 1670 is correct), it's since 351 years.
 

Colin Morrigen

Active Member
The cane in the shape of a shepherd's staff (versus the original straight canes
which were around since the start of the 17th century) came about in Germany
in 1670. It spread to the rest of Europe, and then to the USA where a German
immigrant mentions it for the first time in 1847.
 

Alice Kingsleigh

Well-Known Member
For some people Christmas is all about food, for others a single piece of candy cane or the smell of pine can take them back to the holidays of their childhood. It's no exaggeration to suggest that Candy Cane is one of the most Christmasized candies of all - probably because it was created for the season and makes a lot of sense to those who choose to seek it out. . According to legend, they have a German history, but given the German origins of the British monarchy during Jane Austen's lifetime, it is no exaggeration to think that the treat could have been brought to England, along with the tree of Noël and others, older. traditions, such as the Yule log. Did Jane like candy sticks or candy canes? We may never know. “According to folklore, in 1670, in Cologne, Germany, the choirmaster of Cologne Cathedral, wishing to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during the tradition of the living nativity scene on Christmas Eve, asked to a local confectioner sweet sticks for them In order to justify the practice of giving candy to children at church services, he asked the candy maker to add a stick on top of each stick, which would help children to remember the shepherds who visited the baby Jesus. In addition, he used the white color of the converted sticks to teach the children the Christian belief in the sinless life of Jesus. From Germany, candy canes spread to other parts of Europe, where they were distributed in plays that re-enact the Nativity. As such, according to this legend, sugar cane became associated with Christmas. A recipe for peppermint candy sticks, white with colored stripes, was published in 1844 in The Complete Pastry Chef, Pastry Chef, and Baker: Simple and Convenient, by Eleanor Parkinson. "Sugar cane" has been mentioned by name in literature since 1866. Chicago confectioners, the Bunte Brothers, filed one of the first patents for sugar cane-making machinery in the early 1920s.
Meanwhile, in 1919 in Albany, Georgia, Bob McCormack began making candy canes for local children. By the middle of the century his company (originally the Famous Candy Company, then the Mills-McCormack Candy Company and later Bobs Candies) had grown into one of the world's leading sugar cane producers. But the manufacture of sugar cane initially required a lot of work which limited the quantities of production. Rods had to be bent manually as they came off the assembly line to create their "J" shape, and the break often exceeded 20%. It was McCormack's brother-in-law, a seminary student in Rome named Gregory Harding Keller, who spent his summers at home working in the candy factory. In 1957, as an ordained Catholic Christian priest of the Diocese of Little Rock, Keller patented his invention, the Keller Machine, which automated the process of twisting soft candies into spiral strips and then cutting them into precise lengths like candy canes.
 

zvrndo

Well-Known Member
A common folkloric story of the origin of candy canes says that in 1670, in Cologne, Germany, the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral, wishing to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during the Living Crèche tradition of Christmas Eve, asked a local candy maker for some "sugar sticks" for them.
 

JWillow

Well-Known Member
Answer: The original candy cane has been around for 350 years.


Interesting to have learned: (Though the candy cane that is more commonly seen today in the shape of a shepherd's hook came about in 1670.
Also the red and white stripes didn't show up until the 1900s. So the candy cane I personally envision is much younger than the original)
 

SUPERSKOUPIDIARIS

Well-Known Member
A record of the 1837 exhibition of the Massachusetts Charitable Mechanic Association, where confections were judged competitively, mentions "stick candy".
A recipe for straight peppermint candy sticks, white with coloured stripes, was published in The Complete Confectioner, Pastry-Cook, and Baker, in 1844.
The earliest documentation of a "candy cane" is found in the short story "Tom Luther's Stockings", published in Ballou's Monthly Magazine in 1866.
A common folkloric story of the origin of candy canes says that in 1670, in Cologne, Germany, the choirmaster at Cologne Cathedral, wishing to remedy the noise caused by children in his church during the Living Crèche tradition of Christmas Eve, asked a local candy maker for some "sugar sticks" for them.
 

Sequoyah

Active Member
Candy canes are thought to originate from Germany in 1670 where the choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral kept the young singer quiet during the creche with sugar sticks , the first Candy canes
 

Gringo45

Active Member
Legend has it that in 1670, the cane shaped candy became historical when a choirmaster at the Cologne Cathedral in Germany bent the sugar-sticks into canes to appear as shepherd's hooks.
 
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