Advent Calendar 6. Game

L00nat33k

Well-Known Member
In Finland, the nuuttipukki as they are called, were evil spirits who would go door to door demanding gifts and leftovers from the Yule feast.
 

Hypnosis

Member
Nuuttipukki - is a child dressed up as a "goat" for St. Knut's Day (a traditional festival celebrated in Sweden and Finland on 13 January)

There a tradition has been observed which is somewhat analogous to the modern Santa Claus, where young men dressed as goats would visit houses.
 

TeknAx

Member
Nuuttipukki originates from Sweden and refers to Saint Knut's Day. Nuuttipukki are the men dressed as scary goats. (It's a bit like trick or treat.)
 

Dr Roth

Well-Known Member
it was the first sort of version of Santa in Finland, who went from house to house and demanded food and drinks or would do naughty deeds
 

zvrndo

Well-Known Member
Nuuttipukki or Saint Knut's Day is a traditional festival celebrated in Sweden and Finland on 13 January. A tradition has been observed which is somewhat analogous to the modern Santa Claus, where young men dressed as goats (Finnish: nuuttipukki) would visit houses. Usually the dress was an inverted fur jacket, a leather or birch bark mask, and horns. Unlike Santa Claus, Nuuttipukki was a scary character (cf. Krampus). The men dressed as nuuttipukki wandered from house to house, came in, and typically demanded food from the household and especially leftover alcoholic beverages. Unless Nuuttipukki received a salary from the host, he committed evil deeds.
 

Fargo Winch

Member
Nuuttipukki comes from Finland and means goats. It is a tradition observed which is somewhat analogous to the modern Santa Claus, where young men dressed as goats would visit houses Unlike Santa Claus, Nuuttipukki was a scary character.
 

ghafour

Member
Originates from finland and it means a child that dresses as a goat for st. knut's day, which is in turna traditional festival celebrated in finland and denamrk
 

knottsck

Active Member
Nuuttipukki's origin goes back to Finland. Nuuttipukki is known as a few different things:
  • a man with antlers,
  • the "New Year Buck"
  • a horned, goat-like humanoid
He wanders around visiting houses with an entourage of masked folk on the first week of the new year, in the past coinciding with Saint Knut's Day which was originally on January 7 but now it is held on January 13 so the two no longer overlap. He demands leftover food and alcohol in order to keep him from doing evil deeds such as trashing one's garden, scaring animals, harassing servants, etc. Nuuttipukki may decide to proceed with his evil doings despite getting food and alcohol as he is a wild card when it comes to his actions as he could try to scare children one time, but another time he would hand out gifts.

Santa Claus arrived in Finland from Central Europe through Sweden. The Finnish name of Santa, which is joulupukki, refers to the old kekripukki or nuuttipukki tradition.

 

delldell56

Well-Known Member
I keep forgetting to come check the forum :(

I used to play with a Finnish player, who'd talk about the Joulupukki or the Finnish Santa, who was an evolved horned goat with some humanoid looks. He had an entourage of masked humans looking like horned men (the nuuttipukki) that around Saint Knut Day would visit villages, going from house to house demanding bribes & leftover food and wine after the Yule Feast (old version of Christmas) as a sacrifice or present to the Yule Goat. Over time, the tradition was to give them the leftovers as the pack was usually a group of youngsters from another villages dressed as nuuttipukki, who drunk and mischevious from the Christmas celebrations were ready to trash the gardens or scare the animals; but it seems originally the nuuttipukki was supposed to scare off the spirits of the dead, passed away relatives that were lured back to this world by the celebrations, and the gifts given to them were payment or reward for their services. Nuuttipukki translates from Finnish literally as "nutcracker".
 

Allan Quatermain

Active Member
On nuutinpäivä, a tradition has been observed which is somewhat analogous to the modern Santa Claus, where young men dressed as goats (Finnish: nuuttipukki) would visit houses. Usually the dress was an inverted fur jacket, a leather or birch bark mask, and horns.
Unlike Santa Claus, Nuuttipukki was a scary character (cf. Krampus).
The men dressed as nuuttipukki wandered from house to house, came in, and typically demanded food from the household and especially leftover alcoholic beverages. Unless Nuuttipukki received a salary from the host, he committed evil deeds.
A dialectical proverb from Noormarkku says: Hyvä Tuomas joulun tua, paha Knuuti poijes viä or 'Good [St.] Thomas brings Christmas, evil Knut takes [it] away.'
In Finland the Nuuttipukki tradition is still kept alive in areas of Satakunta, Southwest Finland and Ostrobothnia. However, nowadays the character is usually played by children and now involves a happy encounter.
 

zarmx

Member
Origin: Finland
Meaning: Evil spirits who would go door to door demanding gifts and leftovers from the Yule feast.
 

Sequoyah

Active Member
In Finland, the nuuttipukki were evil spirits who would go door to door demanding gifts and leftovers from the Yule feast.
 

Cardmyster

Active Member
It originated from Finland. Also known as the "New Year`s Goat", They were there to take your Christmas away by taking your leftover food and alcohol.
 

boot

Active Member
Nuuttipukit (dialect word of the St. Knut's Day) are masked children who are part of the Finnish rotate from house to house Nuutti day , ie on 13 january. They perform the song and usually get a small reward for it. [1] continued in western Finland until today resembles an old tradition in Northern and Eastern Finland Easter marathon virvontaa .
 
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